blogpage

Cain and Abel - A Reimagining

by Dr. Jeff Spiess

If I’m encouraging us all to think about our own mortality, why would I write about murder?  

What would it feel like to be the original murderer?
They were the only two children in the world, yet they were rivals … It was unfair! He hadn’t understood the rules, but he realized that he had lost…

Today, in the first of an occasional series stemming from my interest in stories and images of death and dying as portrayed in the arts, literature, sacred texts, and popular culture, I reimagine the ancient Hebrew story of Cain and Abel (from Genesis chapter 4).

Crying in Baseball

Crying in Baseball
by Dr. Jeff Spiess
My wife calls it happy face, sad face. It is the montage of televised images that immediately follows the final out of the World Series. The victors take the field, fist-bumping, embracing, donning the championship caps, the losers sit in their dugout, often alone, heads down, and, yes, sometimes crying. Their struggle through 162 regular season games and three playoff series in October has ended in defeat. They will not hoist a trophy or be the stars of a hometown parade. They have died, perhaps valiantly, but essentially ignominiously, and that is good cause for tears.

Your Navel, Your Humanity

by Dr. Jeff Spiess
You don’t remember it, but it happened; you were there, playing a starring role...The indisputable evidence is there in that wrinkled dimple in the middle of your abdomen.

The Smirk

by Dr. Jeff Spiess
I heard the chuckle dozens of times, saw the smirk over and over. The chuckle was one syllable long, a quick exhalation, between a “huh” and a cough. The smirk was a quick pull at one corner of the mouth, a slight near-wink of the eyelid on the same side, closer to a tic than an expression. They were simultaneous, took less than a second, but spoke volumes.